Sunday, January 22, 2017

Husbands of Blood--Strong Women and their Faithful God

Note: This post is part of a series of posts on marriage/relationships. I pray that this "mini-series" would be a blessing to you! Please feel free to share any of your own thoughts in the comments; I would love to hear them! 


If you are new to this series, you can find the Introduction HERE, Part 1 HERE , Part 2 HERE, Part 3 HERE, and Part 4 HERE

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My sister burst through our front door, pug-in-arms, a smile on her face, rambling about a lesser-known woman in the Bible--one she'd been thinking about--Zipporah, the wife of Moses. 

Chattering on about strong women in the Bible (one of her favorites is Jael, bearer of the tent peg :-)) she stepped into my living room-- 

The conversation that ensued from her insights is what initially sparked this post. I needed direction for my marriage series. Her wisdom steered my thinking and helped me to focus my thoughts. 

Before I really delve into this post, I want to be clear about what "direction" I am coming from. I believe that a man is the head of his family under Christ. I believe in a traditional, Biblical view of manhood and womanhood. That men and women are equal under the headship and authority of Christ, but that both have their unique and distinct roles.

Wives, submit to your own husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is head of the wife, as also Christ is head of the church; and He is the Savior of the body. (Ephesians 5:22-23)

But I want you to know that the head of every man is Christ, the head of woman is man, and the head of Christ is God. Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonors his head. But every woman who prays or prophesies with her head uncovered dishonors her head, for that is one and the same as if her head were shaved. For if a woman is not covered, let her also be shorn. But if it is shameful for a woman to be shorn or shaved, let her be covered. For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, since he is the image and glory of God; but woman is the glory of man. For man is not from woman, but woman from man. Nor was man created for the woman, but woman for the man.  For this reason the woman ought to have a symbol of authority on her head, because of the angels. Nevertheless, neither is man independent of woman, nor woman independent of man, in the Lord. For as woman came from man, even so man also comes through woman; but all things are from God.  (I Corinthians 11:3-12)


An understanding of that view helps to lay the foundation for this article. Because where I am taking these thoughts veers away from the usual direction that this flow of thinking leads. 

I want to provide three examples of strong women in the Bible and where their obedience led them and what that meant for their relationship toward their male counterpart in terms with their walk with their Heavenly Father. I want to apply their obedience to our lives today. 

Because the usual conclusion of a traditional view of male headship is that the man, ultimately, has the last word. Even if the wife disagrees, even if her husband is wrong, even if the husband is grossly sinning, the wife is to submit to his leadership and authority. 

I believe that this is an unbiblical strain of thinking when carried out in the individual lives of believing women who fear God. 

There are times when we do stay silent and pray. At times, the Spirit directs us in this way. And then there are times when we lovingly confront our husbands and our wisdom helps to turn them from a sinful or unwise path.  And finally there are times when directed by the Holy Spirit that we separate ourselves from the decisions of our husbands in order to obey a greater authority--our Father who is above all. 

We live in a devastatingly fallen world, where circumstances are not always "normal". 

And sometimes we are called to walk outside of the normal "box." 

Not in a spirit of rebellion, but in a spirit of utter and complete submission to God's authority, even when it might mean upsetting the boat and angering a husband who is on a path of sinful rebellion or explicit and continual disobedience. 



I think that it is important to remember that our husbands are not God. We love them, we honor them, we respect their position and authority, but ultimately they are not God--the ultimate Head. And obedience to His authority and wisdom should prevail in our lives. 

There are times when obeying God will mean that we "disobey" our husbands. It will cause us pain. It must be done extremely prayerfully. And it is Biblical. 

I want to explain this using three examples--these three strike me the most powerfully in Scripture, and I would encourage you to actually go to the texts and ask the Lord to reveal His wisdom through them to you--these are my own reflections and understanding of the passages. 
  • Abigail and Nabal~I Samuel 25 
The account of Abigail and Nabal has always fascinated me. If you aren't familiar with the story, I would encourage you to read it in full--that is so important to gaining a right understanding of the text. But the jist of the story is this: 

Abigail, a beautiful, wise woman (I Samuel 25:3) is married to a man named Nabal. Nabal, a very rich man, is described as surly, harsh, and ultimately lacking in wisdom. He pompously refuses to help David and his men, arrogantly ignoring David's request for provisions. David, who has helped and protected Nabal, is angered by Nabal's response. He determines to fight Nabal and his men, leaving no one alive. 

Abigail learns of what is transpiring. One of her servants tells her-

Look, David sent messengers from the wilderness to greet our master; and he reviled them. But the men were very good to us, and we were not hurt, nor did we miss anything as long as we accompanied them, when we were in the fields. They were a wall to us both by night and day, all the time we were with them keeping the sheep. Now therefore, know and consider what you will do, for harm is determined against our master and against all his household. For he is such a scoundrel that one cannot speak to him. (I Samuel 25;14-17)

Abigail then directly goes against the will of her husband in order to protect and save her household. She orders that her donkey be saddled up, provisions be brought to David and his men, and travels herself to explain the situation. 

In this way, she saves her household, prevents David from vengefully shedding blood, and gains the confidence and trust of David. 

Abigail is not afraid to call Nabal what he is in accordance with how he is acting--a fool (I Samuel 25:25). She explains her husband's stubbornness and pride to David unashamedly and without protecting her husband in any way--as her husband has consistently and arrogantly defied God without repentance. 

The Lord acted on behalf of Abigail. As the account goes, she returned home without telling Nabal what had happened until the next day, as he was drunk when she came home at night. 

The Lord struck Nabal and he died within 10 days. David ultimately asked Abigail to become his wife. One can only imagine the joy that Abigail experienced in this after being married to such a cruel and unrighteous man. 

Here, in the account of Abigail and Nabal, we see a godly woman responding to the foolish actions of her rebellious, unbelieving husband. There is absolutely no condemnation for Abigails's actions. It is clear that she acted wisely in accordance with God's will, even though her actions directly conflicted her husband's. Abigail acted independently of her husband's wishes in order to obey a greater authority when the situation called for it. 

  • Zipporah and Moses~Exodus 4:24-26
This is a short passage, so I'll include it here--

And it came to pass on the way, at the encampment, that the Lord met him and sought to kill him. Then Zipporah took a sharp stone and cut off the foreskin of her son and cast it at Moses’ feet, and said, “Surely you are a husband of blood to me!” So He let him go. Then she said, “You are a husband of blood!—because of the circumcision. Exodus 4:24-26

This is a story that I have honestly never given much thought to, until recently. But it is intriguing to me. Moses, a great man of God, in the midst of serving the Lord, had neglected a direct command of God to him and to the people of Israel. I believe, from Zipporah's response, that he was aware of it. Perhaps he was so busy with leading the children of Israel, that he had just put this "small" thing off. His son was not circumcised. Moses just hadn't gotten around to obeying that particular command. But in God's eyes, it was not a small matter--the text says that because of this act of disobedience, "the Lord met him and sought to kill him." Well!  Zipporah, wise woman that she was, took the initiative and circumcised her son immediately, throwing the foreskin at her husband's feet. This story makes me think that those Hebrew women meant business! If her husband wasn't going to obey the Lord, then she would assume the spiritual leadership in that situation at that time and do it herself. In actuality, she took on the role of priest in her action, as the priest was responsible for circumcision.

And so here we have Moses, a believing, disobedient husband--his wife acted independently of him when his disobedience would negatively affect the family. There are times when we may have to act apart from our husband when he is being spiritually lazy or disobedient so that our family is not compromised. 

Let me give a practical example here. Our husbands should be leading our families in prayer and devotions, but if they are not or will not or are complacent about doing it or do not do it consistently (and we have repeatedly asked them to do this), I believe that the wife should step in and fulfill this role where possible. The spiritual stability of the family depends upon it. This is a time where we should act independently of our husbands . 
  • Deborah and Barak~ Judges 4
This is obviously not a a situation that involves a husband and wife, rather a man and a woman interacting with one another. 

Reading the account of Deborah and Barak, one will see that Deborah was in a position of leadership; she was a judge in Israel. Barak, commander of the army was unwilling to lead (out of fear) his army to victory against Sisera. Deborah exhorts him to lead the army and he agrees, but only if Deborah will go with him. She agrees, but declares that there will be no honor in the victory for Barak because he would not obey without her. And so Deborah goes, fearlessly leading the Israelite army with Barak; she obtains the honor in the victory. 

This third example shows a weak man who would only obey if Deborah went with him. They switched roles in that instance, she being the leader, and he the support (opposite of the traditional way that the Lord intended). 

There are times when we must push our families forward  in the ways of the Lord when our husband is unwilling to lead and he will follow us as Barak did with Deborah. 


My conclusion from these Biblical passages is that there are times that we act independently of our husbands or of male leadership if it goes against the leadership of God. 

We do this not out of rebellion, or in a spirit of feministic independence but because we are accountable to a higher authority, and before Him one day every knee will bow. 

We do it in humility, we do it with His strength, we do it with dignity, we do it because we love Him. He will honor that costly obedience. And give all grace. 





You might find me on these link-ups:


Strangers and Pilgrims on EarthInspire Me MondayLiteracy Musing MondaysThe Modest MomWhat Joy is Mine, A Mama's Story, Mom's the Word, Rich Faith Rising, Cornerstone Confessions, Mom's Morning Coffee, Raising Homemakers, Classical HomemakingA Wise Woman Builds Her Home, Woman to Woman Ministries,  Testimony TuesdayTell His Story, Women With Intention WednesdaysMessy Marriage,  Graced Simplicity, Children Are A Blessing, Imparting Grace, Thought Provoking ThursdaySoul SurvivalGood Morning MondaysThe Weekend BrewCounting My BlessingsThe HomeAcre Hop, Mommy Moments Link UpGrace and Truth LinkupFaith Filled FridayTell It To Me TuesdaysSHINE Blog HopTGI Saturdays Blog HopRaRaLinkupWord of God SpeakBooknificent ThursdayLiving Proverbs 31Sharing His Beauty Blog LinkupCoffee For Your Heart Weekly LinkUpYou're the Star Blog HopHomesteader HopFresh Market Friday

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Esther, Delilah, and the Power of a Woman

Note: This post is part of a series of posts on marriage/relationships. I pray that this "mini-series" would be a blessing to you! Please feel free to share any of your own thoughts in the comments; I would love to hear them! 


If you are new to this series, you can find the Introduction HERE, Part 1 HERE , Part 2 HERE, and Part 3 HERE.

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Our Pastor has been going through the book of Esther on Sunday mornings. I've really been enjoying this series and it has prompted me to think about the character of Esther  
and her flint-like obedience to God's direction in her life at any cost. 

I remember a film that I watched years ago about Queen Esther. I was so disappointed in it because instead of portraying Esther as a beautiful woman strong in conviction and in her God, she was portrayed as flimsy, overly-girly, and trite--characteristics that I never imagined in a woman willing to risk her life to save her people. 



Esther, the biblical Esther, was a strong woman, a beautiful woman, a woman of hope and grace, a woman who stood firm in the greatest difficulty. 

There is strength in gentleness and true conviction. There is strength in obedience and trust in God. There is strength in waiting and prayer and quietness and then finally, action. 

Esther displays all of these virtues in a beautiful, mysterious way. She captivates the king not only with her physical attractiveness, but with her gentle, quiet spirit. She also captivates the king with her strength of character and willingness to place her own life in danger to save her people. 

In other words, she feared Almighty God more than the King of Persia. What an example to us. 

Esther's people, the Jews, were in grave danger. Their lives were threatened by a wicked man, Haman, who wanted to completely and Satanically, obliterate them. 

And so Esther, in a position of power, was called upon. With dignity, grace, and determination, she accepted the plea of her Uncle Mordecai to approach the king and to plead for the lives of the Jewish people. 

She went to the king, risking her own life.

And then, Queen Esther used no manipulation, no formula, no pouting or whimpering or beating around the bush when she made her argument. She refused to grovel. 

She sensitively laid out her case, using the means of fasting and prayer, showing that her trust was ultimately in God, not in an earthly king. 

There is a mystical, spiritual power behind a woman whose hope is in the Lord. And that power is the Holy Spirit, alive and working in and through her to accomplish the will of the Father.

The man heard Esther. Both kings, Heavenly and earthly, stooped to her plea. 

Esther and her people were safe. 

The will of the Father was accomplished. Her people were saved and the enemy vanquished. 

There is something to be said here also for King Xerxes. He could have ignored Esther. He could have pridefully refused to hear her. But he didn't; his heart was moved--the work of the Father God and his own willingness to listen to a woman offering him wisdom. I believe that the beauty of Esther's spirit had softened his heart--and this was all orchestrated by the Lord. But he could have chosen not to be softened

And I speak to the woman here who thinks--but I've done that! I've tried to walk with the Lord in dignity and honesty and trust. Not perfectly, but in obedience to the Father. I've tried to walk with the Lord as Esther did, and my husband still will not listen to me when I offer him wisdom.

The only answer here is that there is no guarantee. There is no guarantee that a husband will listen.  And this is where our relationship with Jesus Christ comes before even that most intimate relationship with our husband. Because Christ is our Heavenly Husband --and our ultimate aim must be to please Him, leaving our husband's heart in His hands and moving forward with the Lord in obedient trust and walking uprightly with the Father. Even if he will not listen. The Lord will honor your obedience, as painful as that situation is . . . 

Another strong woman comes to mind. 

The woman Delilah--the woman partly responsible for Samson's downfall and shame. The woman whose honey-lips and tantalizing perfume lured Samson to his demise. The woman who stole Samson's heart away from his Heavenly Father for a season. 

The woman who Samson just could not resist . . . and yet, could have, had he made different choices leading up to her betrayal. 

Delilah used her female charms to pull the so-called "wool" over Samson's eyes, to shroud his heart and to dampen his discernment and resolve. 



We are often "hard" on Delilah, but sometimes I wonder if she did what she did partly out of fear. Was her own life threatened by bloodthirsty Philistines who wanted nothing but Samson's utter downfall? They knew of her intimate connection with Samson and were probably threatening Delilah's life--perhaps that of her family, too. 

It is natural to act out of fear when our hope is not in God

So, although this does not excuse Delilah's actions, we may certainly relate to them . . . 

How did Delilah get what she wanted? Through careful manipulation. 

The difference between Esther and Delilah is extremely important to note--and this can be so helpful to us in our relationships with our husbands and in general. Delilah acted insincerely, underhandedly, deceitfully. Esther acted sincerely, transparently, with complete honesty and openness. 

Esther's dependence and hope were in God--not in her beauty, not in the power of her words, not in her power to manipulate the king in any way, but ultimately and utterly, in God

Whether she lived or died. Whether her husband thought well of her or not. Whether she pleased him ultimately or not.

Her hope and strength were in God. 

Delilah's dependence was upon the opposite--upon herself--upon her own powers of manipulation. She used every female "trick" she could muster--whining, pouting, sex, employing her attractiveness and allurement to deceive and destroy. She acted out of selfishness and fear, with no real love in her heart for the man that she gave herself so completely to (and yet, didn't). 



Many men can be won in this way. There is a Satanic power behind deceit and manipulation and using sex as a tool to "encourage" a man to do what we want them to do. 

But this is not the way of Jesus. 

Someone may think, "Well, didn't Esther also manipulate her situation in some way? She dressed as attractively as possible in order to persuade the king and to present her case, she prepared elaborate banquets for him to enjoy and tried her best to ensure that the mood was right for her to address him--isn't that manipulation?"

But the key difference between Esther and Delilah's methods is that Esther didn't use deceit to hide her real motives. Esther was open and honest with no trace of deceit. Delilah's motives were carefully concealed. 

There is a difference in manipulating a situation and being wise in the way that you present something. Was it wise for Esther to make sure that she looked as lovely as possible and anoint herself before going in to see the king? Of course. She wanted to show him how serious she was, how much she respected his authority and kingship. She wanted to make herself pleasing to him in order to present the truth, whereas Delilah made herself pleasing in order to feed a lie to Samson for her own gain. Esther used her beauty and careful approach in order to soften the king's heart, not in order to deceive him. 

The Lord used Esther's beauty and gentle, determined character to touch the heart of the king. 

There is a difference between wisdom and manipulation.  Ultimately, Esther's hope and trust were in God, and in His power and ability to move the heart of the king, not in her own resources of beauty and charm. Delilah relied upon herself, her powers of manipulation, and her ability to move a man's heart in the direction that she wanted it to go. 

Esther's spirit reflected truth and submission to God, whereas Delilah's reflected hidden motives and deceit--the very opposite.

I have read marriage advice--and it has so deeply disturbed me--from respected Christian sources that basically encourage women to manipulate their husbands. 

Treat your husband a certain way and he will love you. 

Use such and such a formula and your marriage will thrive.


Crown your husband king and he will make you his queen. 


It is never from the Lord to manipulate a situation, to attempt to turn a situation in our favor in our own strength apart from the Lord.

We do this in tiny and in great ways in our marriages--and I believe that it always produces frustration or complacency (in a man who knows he's being manipulated but doesn't want to make waves and so allows himself to be manipulated). 

Manipulation never produces that true and lasting peace and contentment that stems from trust in a great and merciful Savior. 

We want a situation to change so badly and we fall prey to advice, even from Christian marriage books.

But the truth is that manipulation only works temporarily and at best produces a false peace and security.

As women, it is so easy to fall prey to the temptation of using manipulation to get what we want. 

The difficult path is waiting on the Lord, as Esther did, trusting in His power and timing--relinquishing our fears into His all-loving hands. 

He is able to turn the heart of the king, to sustain us, to deliver. 

How should we interact with our husbands based upon the examples of Esther and Delilah?



With sincerity, with openness and honesty--prayerfully, our hope and trust in God. 

Not using manipulation or female charms to deceive and distract. 

With honor and dignity, trusting the love of the One who honors those who honor Him. 


Please join me for the next post, which is closely related to this one, next week. The Lord willing, I'll be dealing more in depth with the issue of women who are married to men who are not believers or men professing to be Christians but who are walking in their own way apart from the Lord and how we should respond to that difficulty. 









You might find me on these link-ups:


Strangers and Pilgrims on EarthInspire Me MondayLiteracy Musing MondaysThe Modest MomWhat Joy is Mine, A Mama's Story, Mom's the Word, Rich Faith Rising, Cornerstone Confessions, Mom's Morning Coffee, Raising Homemakers, Classical HomemakingA Wise Woman Builds Her Home, Woman to Woman Ministries,  Testimony TuesdayTell His Story, Women With Intention WednesdaysMessy Marriage,  Graced Simplicity, Children Are A Blessing, Imparting Grace, Thought Provoking ThursdaySoul SurvivalGood Morning MondaysThe Weekend BrewCounting My BlessingsThe HomeAcre Hop, Mommy Moments Link UpGrace and Truth LinkupFaith Filled FridayTell It To Me TuesdaysSHINE Blog HopTGI Saturdays Blog HopRaRaLinkupWord of God SpeakBooknificent ThursdayLiving Proverbs 31Sharing His Beauty Blog LinkupCoffee For Your Heart Weekly LinkUpYou're the Star Blog HopHomesteader HopFresh Market Friday

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Re-using Dover Little Activity Books--A Tip for Frugal Moms

A wonderful resource that I've found in my parenting is  Dover Little Activity books. These tiny activity books fit in the hand of a child and provide creative, constructive, and fun entertainment for various ages. 



They are a "lifesaver" ;-) in the car and at church. They are a fun alternative at home on a rainy day when the kids are tired of books or puzzles. 

They are inexpensive. I usually spend about $1.50-$2.00 per book. 

But when budgets are tight, even that amount may be a little much, as the books are not strongly re-usable. For that reason, I use these books more as a "treat" than an everyday item.

One day, while my son was working on an especially "cute" little Dover (a train station with supposedly re-usable stickers) I noticed that after he used the stickers once, they were not very "re-usable," as promised. The edges were curling and it was difficult to put the stickers back on the sticker sheet that they were originally from for use another time. 

An idea came to me. Why not cover the entire book in tape, including the stickers,  and use velcro to attach the individual stickers to the book for prolonged future use? 



I love tape. I am known to coat entire packages that I am mailing in the lovely substance for added security ;-). So this was right up my alley. 

I carefully coated the little book, and then went on to cover the stickers, front and back. Later, I made a trip to Wal-Mart, where I discovered tiny velcro circles. 



I attached the velcro pieces to the little book itself in various places, and then on the backs of each tape-coated sticker. 





Voila! Now the stickers could be used over and over and applied to different places on the book to create different scenes. 





I tried this with one of our Christmas Dover Little Activity books  after my daughter had completed it once.





My sister suggested using mailing tape (a bit easier than Scotch tape) and this worked even better and faster. 

The books are now highly durable and reuseable. :-) They and the accompanying stickers may be stored in a ziplock bag and brought to church or in the car and used over and over. 



It is a fun (and easy) idea to try. If your children are a little older, they may even enjoy covering the pieces in tape and attaching the velcro. 

Dover Little Activity books  may be found on Amazon (clickable links below and above). You may also find them in your local craft or gift store. There is usually a wonderful selection that continually varies. 

Happy Little Dovering! :-)

Note: In general, Dover Little Activity books are cute, sweet, educational, and innocent, but I have come across a few that I wasn't too keen on---you can pick and choose the ones that you think are edifying and appropriate when you shop. Here is a sampling of some Dover Little Activity books below. 
















You might find me on these link-ups:

Strangers and Pilgrims on EarthInspire Me MondayLiteracy Musing MondaysThe Modest MomWhat Joy is Mine, A Mama's Story, Mom's the Word, Rich Faith Rising, Cornerstone Confessions, Mom's Morning Coffee, Raising Homemakers, Classical HomemakingA Wise Woman Builds Her Home, Woman to Woman Ministries,  Testimony TuesdayTell His Story, Women With Intention WednesdaysMessy Marriage,  Graced Simplicity, Children Are A Blessing, Imparting Grace, Thought Provoking ThursdaySoul SurvivalGood Morning MondaysThe Weekend BrewCounting My BlessingsThe HomeAcre Hop, Mommy Moments Link UpGrace and Truth LinkupFaith Filled FridayTell It To Me TuesdaysSHINE Blog HopTGI Saturdays Blog HopRaRaLinkupWord of God SpeakBooknificent ThursdayLiving Proverbs 31Sharing His Beauty Blog LinkupCoffee For Your Heart Weekly LinkUpYou're the Star Blog HopHomesteader HopFresh Market Friday

Friday, December 30, 2016

Devotional Recommendations for 2017

The Lord has used the following devotionals to greatly bless me. I pray that they may be a blessing to you or to someone you know who is seeking a deeper walk with Christ! 



If someone were to ask me what devotional has had the greatest impact upon my life, I would immediately answer My Utmost for His Highest, by Oswald Chambers. This book spoke to me profoundly in my early years of following the Lord and beginning to learn the sweetness of surrender and obedience. The Lord was peeling away the crusty outer layers of my heart and pouring His truth into my soul. The fullness and richness of Chambers' devotional was daily nourishment to me. My early years as a Christian were years of sweetness and of sensing the Lord's presence and experiencing His nearness in a way that is indescribable. It was the spring of my life with the Lord, and I treasure those years and this devotional which the Lord used so powerfully to grow my heart in obedience and love for Him. 


My mother's copy of Chamber's devotional that she gave to me. 

As I began to grow in my faith, the Lord led me to another devotional which is equally precious to me, Charles Haddon Spurgeon's Morning and Evening. There is so much to glean from Spurgeon, and I have used this book for years and continue to return to it. Spurgeon's wisdom and insights as well as his deep and intimate relationship to the Lord spoke to me--this devotional has been like water to my thirsty soul over and over again. 


A third devotional that the Lord has used in my life is Streams in the Desert. This book, compiled by Mrs. Charles Cowman, was recommended to me by several people, and I finally ordered a copy. I have been enjoying this one immensely. The "old-time" writers' words have been ministering to my heart, and I have been enjoying selections from Pastors and authors like George Matheson (who wrote the hymn "O Love that Wilt Not Let me Go"), Frederick Faber, and others.  If you are seeking a deeper, more intimate walk with the Lord, this is a wonderful devotional to slowly read through. 



 Two other devotionals that the Lord has used to encourage me in my walk with Him have been Charles Stanley's Every Day in His Presence and Elisabeth Elliot's Keep A Quiet Heart. While Keep A Quiet Heart is not a yearly devotional, it is one that could be used devotionally for a shorter period of time and is so rich in wisdom. 




I pray that these recommendations would be helpful! The Lord bless you as you seek His face daily . . . Please feel free to share with me in the comments what devotionals have been an encouragement in your life! 



You might find me on these link-ups:

Strangers and Pilgrims on EarthInspire Me MondayLiteracy Musing MondaysThe Modest MomWhat Joy is Mine, A Mama's Story, Mom's the Word, Rich Faith Rising, Cornerstone Confessions, Mom's Morning Coffee, Raising Homemakers, Classical HomemakingA Wise Woman Builds Her Home, Woman to Woman Ministries,  Testimony TuesdayTell His Story, Women With Intention WednesdaysMessy Marriage,  Graced Simplicity, Children Are A Blessing, Imparting Grace, Thought Provoking ThursdaySoul SurvivalGood Morning MondaysThe Weekend BrewCounting My BlessingsThe HomeAcre Hop, Mommy Moments Link UpGrace and Truth LinkupFaith Filled FridayTell It To Me TuesdaysSHINE Blog HopTGI Saturdays Blog HopRaRaLinkupWord of God SpeakBooknificent ThursdayLiving Proverbs 31Sharing His Beauty Blog LinkupCoffee For Your Heart Weekly LinkUpYou're the Star Blog HopHomesteader HopFresh Market Friday, Fabulous January Party Link Up